Author Topic: SpaceX Splashdown and Recovery  (Read 279 times)

Offline Jeff Raven

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SpaceX Splashdown and Recovery
« on: August 02, 2020, 04:25:13 PM »
It was great to see the successful end of the mission today. I found the differences in the splashdown and recovery between the Apollo days and today interesting. It didn't look like there was anything equivalent to the old balloons (helium I believe?) to keep the capsule upright, and there definitely wasn't a collar attached. I'm not familiar with the design, but it seemed really stable, and also buoyant. The entire process of getting to the capsule and bringing it on board the recovery vessel was quite fast, and smooth. Also a lot less risky than having to haul it out of the water dangling from a helicopter.  All in all, I don't know if SpaceX (and NASA) could have asked for a better first manned mission.

Offline Obviousman

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Re: SpaceX Splashdown and Recovery
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2020, 04:57:31 PM »
I didn't want to wake up soo early to see it. The footage (NASA TV?) they are showing on the news here is pretty poor quality.

Good to see everything went OK.

Offline Jeff Raven

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Re: SpaceX Splashdown and Recovery
« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2020, 06:01:40 PM »
Yeah, the quality definitely could have been better, even on the recovery ship. I was expecting at least 4K if not 8K, given that it's a Musk production. Of course, the lack of crystal-clear images all the way down will just be more fuel for the conspiracy nuts, but then again they don't really need help coming up with things that are "suspicious."

Offline Zakalwe

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Re: SpaceX Splashdown and Recovery
« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2020, 06:51:03 PM »
It was great to see the successful end of the mission today. I found the differences in the splashdown and recovery between the Apollo days and today interesting. It didn't look like there was anything equivalent to the old balloons (helium I believe?) to keep the capsule upright, and there definitely wasn't a collar attached. I'm not familiar with the design, but it seemed really stable, and also buoyant. The entire process of getting to the capsule and bringing it on board the recovery vessel was quite fast, and smooth. Also a lot less risky than having to haul it out of the water dangling from a helicopter.  All in all, I don't know if SpaceX (and NASA) could have asked for a better first manned mission.

The capsule is a totally different design so it's no surprise that there are marked differences.

The HQ pictures and videos normally follow after a day or two..... Keep an eye on SpaceX's Flickr site.
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Offline smartcooky

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Re: SpaceX Splashdown and Recovery
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2020, 09:07:47 PM »
It was great to see the successful end of the mission today. I found the differences in the splashdown and recovery between the Apollo days and today interesting. It didn't look like there was anything equivalent to the old balloons (helium I believe?) to keep the capsule upright, and there definitely wasn't a collar attached. I'm not familiar with the design, but it seemed really stable, and also buoyant. The entire process of getting to the capsule and bringing it on board the recovery vessel was quite fast, and smooth. Also a lot less risky than having to haul it out of the water dangling from a helicopter.  All in all, I don't know if SpaceX (and NASA) could have asked for a better first manned mission.

AIUI, they have ballast tanks behind the heat shield into which they pump seawater to stabilize the capsule.

I didn't want to wake up soo early to see it. The footage (NASA TV?) they are showing on the news here is pretty poor quality.

Good to see everything went OK.


I watched it at breakfast time here.... they got it done in time for Corn Flakes!
« Last Edit: August 02, 2020, 09:09:26 PM by smartcooky »
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Offline jfb

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Re: SpaceX Splashdown and Recovery
« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2020, 08:49:30 AM »
Yeah, the quality definitely could have been better, even on the recovery ship. I was expecting at least 4K if not 8K, given that it's a Musk production. Of course, the lack of crystal-clear images all the way down will just be more fuel for the conspiracy nuts, but then again they don't really need help coming up with things that are "suspicious."

Maritime channels don’t have the bandwidth for live HD video (at least, that’s my understanding).  That may change once Starlink is fully operational, but for now it’s gonna be potato-cam quality for live feeds, even for a Musk production.

Offline Jeff Raven

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Re: SpaceX Splashdown and Recovery
« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2020, 12:41:17 PM »

Maritime channels don’t have the bandwidth for live HD video (at least, that’s my understanding).  That may change once Starlink is fully operational, but for now it’s gonna be potato-cam quality for live feeds, even for a Musk production.

You mean Elon wasn't willing to use his Area 51 tech on this?  I'm very disappointed.   ;D