Author Topic: Guardian article - Are the 2012 Olympics part of a plot to take over the world?  (Read 20198 times)

Offline gillianren

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An Olympics-related question--I have heard that people are being sued for using "London," "2012," and "Olympics" in too close proximity in sentences.  Is this an exaggeration for effect?  Are there actual cases of trademark infringement lawsuits being filed?
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Offline Andromeda

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I don't know about lawsuits, but I have heard of a number of cases of people being instructed to stop whatever they are doing - like the baker who had to remove the bagel display.

http://www.londonbusinessnetwork.com/2012-information/using-the-london-2012-brand/defences-to-infringement

http://www.london2012.com/documents/brand-guidelines/statutory-marketing-rights.pdf
« Last Edit: July 29, 2012, 04:17:42 PM by Andromeda »
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Offline Echnaton

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The local organizers and IOC jealously guard their name.  They claim world wide rights to the word "Olympic."  So if you are the Olympic Greek Restaurant and the games come to your town, you better change your name.  The sponsors pay for the rights to use the trademarks and count on the IOC has to protect the investment. 
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Offline Chew

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So if you are the Olympic Greek Restaurant and the games come to your town,

Then you can sue the IOC's asses off for infringement.

Offline Inanimate Carbon Rod

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An Olympics-related question--I have heard that people are being sued for using "London," "2012," and "Olympics" in too close proximity in sentences.  Is this an exaggeration for effect?  Are there actual cases of trademark infringement lawsuits being filed?

I saw on local news that a London Cafe advertising "Olympic Breakfasts" was served with a cease and desist order by the Olympic Organisation, but whether it's true or down to hysteria, urban myth or poor research I don't know. I don't believe it to be true.
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Offline gillianren

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Well, should Seattle ever get the Olympics, they will not be able to enforce that.  The City of Olympia has been called that since 1853, and the Olympic Mountains were first called that in 1788.  Yet another reason to assume that Seattle is never going to get the Olympics, I guess.
"This sounds like a job for Bipolar Bear . . . but I just can't seem to get out of bed!"

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Offline Inanimate Carbon Rod

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In this article about the Olympic "Brand Police" there is a mention of their activities:

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/olympics/news/london-2012-athletes-voice-anger-over-sponsorban-rule-7987182.html

Quote
...the so-called brand police - whose activities include banning a Dorset butcher’s sign of the Olympic rings made from sausages....
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Offline twik

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Of course not - collusion in judging, doping, other forms of cheating are just too mundane for conspiracy theorists. Unless they can somehow be worked into the Plot to Enslave Us All.

Offline Echnaton

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I have lost interest in the Olympics over the years as they have become more and more a venue for professional sports.  I just don't care if a group of millionaire NBA players can win a gold medal or not.  I'd prefer to see an age limit put on several sports where there is a significant global professional carrier path, such as basketball.  A limit set perhaps by the average age of rookies joining professional teams or up to 22 years old or so for athletes still at universities.   The Games have moves toward a way draw the largest audience rather than a venue to find who are the best young people in challenging sports.
The sun shone, having no alternative, on the nothing new. —Samuel Beckett

Offline Donnie B.

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I have lost interest in the Olympics over the years as they have become more and more a venue for professional sports.  I just don't care if a group of millionaire NBA players can win a gold medal or not.  I'd prefer to see an age limit put on several sports where there is a significant global professional carrier path, such as basketball.  A limit set perhaps by the average age of rookies joining professional teams or up to 22 years old or so for athletes still at universities.   The Games have moves toward a way draw the largest audience rather than a venue to find who are the best young people in challenging sports.
I believe that's already true of Olympic soccer.  There's an age limit, but each team can have up to three (?) players older than the limit. 

Offline twik

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Well, though, why should there be an age limit? The Olympics were not started to showcase "developing talent", they were to show the best of the best right now. If the best person is over 30, or 35, or 50, what does that matter?

I can't find the heart to snipe about professional athletes participating. either. Do you remember not that long ago when the "best of the best" in the West had to drop out of amateur competition entirely, because they couldn't afford to compete for free, while the Warsaw Pact countries stuck their best athletes into the military, and told them their duty was to compete (even if it sometimes meant taking very nasty substances with serious long-term consequences)? Or even worse, the despicable treatment given Jim Thorpe?

If people are good, let them compete. While today's athletes may seem crass, at least we no longerlive in a society where only the idle rich can afford to compete, while working people never get a chance to play for their country.

Offline Noldi400

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Have you heard that the Aurora incident was carried out by the CIA to lay the foundation for a federal ban on private ownership of firearms?

All we need now is for Holmes to claim that he's a "patsy". Wonder if there are any out-of-work nightclub owners looking for a gig?
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Offline twik

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Noldi400 - that theory just hurts my heart. People are so fixed to their hobbiehorses that they will exploit any human tragedy to go, "See? NOW the Evil Ones are going to descend on us... soon ... any day now... just wait, you'll see... any time, now...."

Offline Andromeda

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The Daily Mail is pants, and this is a new low.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2181066/Olympics-2012-UFO-sighted-Games-opening-ceremony.html

Golden rule: don't read the comments unless you want your brain to melt.  Lots of HB's and CT's there.
"The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny...'" - Isaac Asimov.

Offline Al Johnston

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Have you heard that the Aurora incident was carried out by the CIA to lay the foundation for a federal ban on private ownership of firearms?

That's (almost) the default NRA position. It's certainly widely believed enough for there to be a distinct rise in gun sales after such incidents...
"Cheer up!" they said. "It could be worse!" they said.
So I did.
And it was.