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The Hoax Theory / Re: Carl Zeiss Planar 50mm f/0.7 in Apollo?
« Last post by Abaddon on Today at 03:19:18 PM »
Well, we know that only ten of them were manufactured. NASA purchased six, Kubrick purchased three, Zeiss retained one.

We know what Kubrick used his for. NASA and Zeiss not so much. Zeiss was probably so they could show off. "Look what we made"

I had a rummage in the Apollo record but drew a blank. Perhaps they have simply been mis-identified in the Apollo record as Jay suggested.
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The Hoax Theory / Re: Carl Zeiss Planar 50mm f/0.7 in Apollo?
« Last post by Trebor on Today at 01:53:17 PM »
Thanks for that,
The quote ""This extremely fast lens had been used by the American space administration to take pictures of the dark side of the moon from outer space,""
Is what caused me to look into this as it doesn't make any sense. Although I'm just a numpty I don't see the point of them trying to photograph the moon at night from orbit, and don't see the value of photographing with a lens that short.
Its just weird.
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The Hoax Theory / Re: Carl Zeiss Planar 50mm f/0.7 in Apollo?
« Last post by ineluki on July 13, 2020, 08:18:52 AM »
Supposedly

Zeiss mentions the lens on their website, but not as one of those that were actually used by NASA
https://www.zeiss.com/corporate/int/about-zeiss/history/50-years-moon-landing.html

https://lenspire.zeiss.com/photo/en/article/zeiss-then-and-now claims "This extremely fast lens had been used by the American space administration to take pictures of the dark side of the moon from outer space," but doesn't go into detail about what mission that would have been.

https://nasasearch.nasa.gov/search?query=zeiss+planar&affiliate=nasa&utf8=%E2%9C%93 does not mention the lens at all.

P.S.
I found a thread about it on
https://space.stackexchange.com/questions/37975/stanley-kubrick-used-a-nasa-inspired-lens-to-film-by-candlelight-in-barry-lyndon

Had a look and none of them mention it. Its possible NASA may have brought some of the lenses for testing but never actually used them for anything....
Or the story is fictional. Not sure

It ssems unlikely that Zeiss would have completely invented the story, I guess NASA might have considered the use of the lens, but ultimately preferred the longer focal lengths.
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The Reality of Apollo / Re: Were All Low Quality Apollo Photographs Released?
« Last post by Obviousman on July 12, 2020, 10:47:43 PM »
I've read somewhere (wish I could remember where!) that astronauts were encouraged to "shoot twice" as a contingency for bad exposures.

I used to be a Mission Co-ordinator with Coastwatch during the late 90s. The one thing that was always drilled into us was to take multiple images of a target because film is cheaper than fuel (i.e. we didn't have to get the film developed, found we missed things, re-locate the contact, then fly out to it again and take more photos).

(Well, it was until Customs changed the rules and ensured photography would be degraded....)
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The Hoax Theory / Re: Carl Zeiss Planar 50mm f/0.7 in Apollo?
« Last post by JayUtah on July 12, 2020, 04:21:46 PM »
The press kits mention a different Zeiss Planar lens.  I wonder if it's just mistaken identity.
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General Discussion / Re: Kids say the darnedest things...
« Last post by gillianren on July 12, 2020, 11:43:35 AM »
Simon's godmother and her mom, the kids' adopted grandmother, stopped by yesterday to do a social distancing birthday drop.  I came outside first with Irene, who said, "I supposed to say hi."
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The Hoax Theory / Re: Carl Zeiss Planar 50mm f/0.7 in Apollo?
« Last post by Trebor on July 12, 2020, 09:58:55 AM »
Had a look and none of them mention it. Its possible NASA may have brought some of the lenses for testing but never actually used them for anything....
Or the story is fictional. Not sure
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The Reality of Apollo / Re: Were All Low Quality Apollo Photographs Released?
« Last post by Peter B on July 12, 2020, 09:04:13 AM »
I looked again.

The two blurred photos are blurred versions of 6779 and 6791.

Whoever created those images seems to have had multiple goes at copying an earlier generation of the photos.

I'll leave it to the people with actual photographic knowledge and experience to confirm this.
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The Reality of Apollo / Re: Were All Low Quality Apollo Photographs Released?
« Last post by Peter B on July 12, 2020, 08:58:18 AM »
These images are taken from an eBay listing of an "Apollo 70mm first generation duplicate":



It's AS12-46-6779. The chopped and blurry photographs without written IDs above and below the main exposure are interesting, as only sharp counterparts appear to exist in the Apollo image catalog.
It looks like the previous frame on the strip was taken from the same angle and is brighter - which doesn't match the previous photo in the Apollo catalog, AS12-46-6778.

However the bottom of the three images is very obviously a blurred example of AS12-46-6780.

Quote
Same with this one from another listing, AS12-46-6791:



There is a blurred exposure above the main photograph, which isn't the previous photo in the catalog (AS12-46-67990).

AFAICT you're right. However I wonder if the simplest explanation is that these aren't a simple copy of the whole magazines, reel for reel, but instead copies of selected images.

Quote
I've read somewhere (wish I could remember where!) that astronauts were encouraged to "shoot twice" as a contingency for bad exposures. The Apollo 11 mission report mentions "to ensure good photography, the crew varied the exposures one stop in either direction from the exposure indicated".

I wonder if we're seeing photographs that were never assigned an AS12-... ID or released? It would be fascinating to see the blurred and blown out images if they exist somewhere.

As far as I know, all the Apollo photos were released. If you look at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, they show all the photos, including all the blurred, poorly framed, or sunstruck photos: https://www.lpi.usra.edu/resources/apollo/catalog/70mm/

Otherwise, someone may be enough of an Apollo photo nerd as to be able to identify the blurred photos.
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The Reality of Apollo / Were All Low Quality Apollo Photographs Released?
« Last post by TippedIceberg on July 12, 2020, 07:55:24 AM »
These images are taken from an eBay listing of an "Apollo 70mm first generation duplicate":



It's AS12-46-6779. The chopped and blurry photographs without written IDs above and below the main exposure are interesting, as only sharp counterparts appear to exist in the Apollo image catalog.
It looks like the previous frame on the strip was taken from the same angle and is brighter - which doesn't match the previous photo in the Apollo catalog, AS12-46-6778.

Same with this one from another listing, AS12-46-6791:



There is a blurred exposure above the main photograph, which isn't the previous photo in the catalog (AS12-46-67990).

I've read somewhere (wish I could remember where!) that astronauts were encouraged to "shoot twice" as a contingency for bad exposures. The Apollo 11 mission report mentions "to ensure good photography, the crew varied the exposures one stop in either direction from the exposure indicated".

I wonder if we're seeing photographs that were never assigned an AS12-... ID or released? It would be fascinating to see the blurred and blown out images if they exist somewhere.

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