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Apollo Discussions => The Reality of Apollo => Topic started by: Glom on January 13, 2022, 01:43:12 PM

Title: Linus on the Saturn V IU
Post by: Glom on January 13, 2022, 01:43:12 PM
https://youtu.be/olRF5Ckaga0

Don't know if people have seen this video by Linus on the Saturn V IU. Interesting to see someone who normally talks about the latest gaming hardware talk about something of such a different generation.
Title: Re: Linus on the Saturn V IU
Post by: smartcooky on January 13, 2022, 07:53:34 PM
I've seen Destin's companion video which goes into more detail about the woven memory cores. Its a lot longer (about 45 minutes) but if this stuff really does interest you, its worth every minute.

I started a thread about it about a year ago

https://www.apollohoax.net/forum/index.php?topic=1828.msg55055#msg55055

Title: Re: Linus on the Saturn V IU
Post by: Glom on January 15, 2022, 03:36:13 PM
Interesting.
Title: Re: Linus on the Saturn V IU
Post by: jfb on January 17, 2022, 09:35:23 AM
There’s one bit (I think its on the SED2 channel video) where Luke gets to abuse Linus a little:

Linus: Are those fiber optic cables or something?

Luke: Boy, those are wires.

Luke also describes their postflight troubleshooting technique of printing out an octal dump of the telemetry, cutting some holes in a cardboard template, and going frame by frame, writing down the values for whatever sensor they were interested in, converting that to the actual measurement (temperature, voltage, whatever), plotting those values on a graph (by hand), and after a couple of weeks of effort, realizing that wasn’t the problem after all.

Having scrubbed through hex dumps as a larval programmer, that bit spoke to me deeply.

What I love most about these videos (but especially Destin’s) is how they quietly refute the whole "we didn’t have the technology to go to the Moon".  While these videos specifically cover the Saturn V computers, the apply just as well to the Apollo flight computers.  The hardware was primitive by today’s standards, but it was sufficient to do the job.