Author Topic: A FAIR DEBATE  (Read 50077 times)

Offline Echnaton

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Re: A FAIR DEBATE
« Reply #180 on: August 29, 2012, 07:39:41 PM »
Obviously not

Well, I've seen pictures of both of you, so I'd assumed he wasn't claiming to be your father. 
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Offline Glom

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Re: A FAIR DEBATE
« Reply #181 on: August 29, 2012, 08:55:53 PM »
Like King George VI.

Offline Echnaton

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Re: A FAIR DEBATE
« Reply #182 on: August 29, 2012, 09:51:35 PM »
The sun shone, having no alternative, on the nothing new. —Samuel Beckett

Offline Not Myself

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Re: A FAIR DEBATE
« Reply #183 on: August 29, 2012, 09:51:51 PM »
I could not possibly do justice to his voice, but when someone wants my attention and I need to finish up what I'm doing first, I might say "A moment please!" in the Dr. Strangelove voice.
Is a mock Prusso-German voice really that hard? I thought everyone could do one, more or less.

The prior talk was about James Earl Jones in the bomber crew, and it is his voice to which I couldn't do justice.

Probably my favorite line from that character (and one I still occasionally use) is Vy didn't you tell the vorld, eh?

Also very good, although I think I prefer the one where he mentions that it is not a practical deterrent, for reasons which at this moment must be all too obvious.
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Offline Al Johnston

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Re: A FAIR DEBATE
« Reply #184 on: August 30, 2012, 05:23:33 AM »
"You can't fight in here!  This is the War Room!"
That's just about everybody's favorite line. Mine too, if I had to pick only one. But I couldn't.

I'd have to go with, "...you'll have to answer to the Coca-Cola company!"

Or maybe just, "Ya-Hooooo!  Yaaaa-Hooo!"

Dang, you're right, it's impossible to choose.

I rather like:

"Strangelove? That's not a kraut name."

"He changed it when he became a citizen. It used to be Murkwerdigliebe."
"Cheer up!" they said. "It could be worse!" they said.
So I did.
And it was.

Offline RedneckR0nin

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Re: A FAIR DEBATE
« Reply #185 on: August 30, 2012, 06:31:58 AM »
"You can't fight in here!  This is the War Room!"
That's just about everybody's favorite line. Mine too, if I had to pick only one. But I couldn't.

I can only imagine how many takes of each scene of that movie must have been done, between Kubrick's well-known perfectionism and the actors cracking up over the dialogue.

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He shot back that characteristic toothy grin from ear to ear and said, "Young man, you're way too young to know that reference."
I'm actually surprised he remembered it. Most actors say they forget their lines as quickly as they learn them. William Shatner said during his college appearances in the '70s that it was like cramming for a test. All the Star Trek actors say they constantly encounter fans who can quote every line of dialogue and expect them to remember it as well as they do.

I'm sure Jones knows as well as anyone how enduringly popular that movie has been. I still rank it as either #1 or #2 among the greatest movies of all time.

Not me ....I have a romance for this one in particular
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Offline ka9q

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Re: A FAIR DEBATE
« Reply #186 on: August 30, 2012, 03:00:28 PM »
The really frightening thing about Brig. Gen. Jack D. Ripper was that he wasn't terribly far from some real life USAF generals, particularly Curtis E. LeMay (who, at age 44, had 3 more stars than Ripper, a mere base commander). And it wasn't because both constantly chewed on a trademark cigar.

From Wikipedia:
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In 1949, LeMay was first to propose that a nuclear war be conducted by delivering the nuclear arsenal in a single overwhelming blow, going as far as "killing a nation".
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Despite popular claims that LeMay advanced the notion of preventive nuclear war, the historical record indicates LeMay actually advocated justified preemptive nuclear war. Several documents show LeMay advocating preemptive attack of the Soviet Union, had it become clear the Soviets were preparing to attack SAC or the US.
Yes, but how do you know when it's clear the Soviets were preparing to attack? Ask them? Circa 1980 we had several false alerts that indicated the Russians were attacking us. Fortunately, "launch on warning" was not then US policy. A decade ago we launched a preemptive war against another enemy we were sure was about to attack us with weapons of mass destruction. They turned out not to have any at all.
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During the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, LeMay clashed again with U.S. President John F. Kennedy and Defense Secretary McNamara, arguing that he should be allowed to bomb nuclear missile sites in Cuba. He opposed the naval blockade and, after the end of the crisis, suggested that Cuba be invaded anyway, even after the Russians agreed to withdraw. LeMay called the peaceful resolution of the crisis "the greatest defeat in our history".
Yet Kennedy's relative restraint almost certainly saved our lives. After the Cold War, we learned from the Russians that had JFK followed LeMay's advice, the Soviet commanders were authorized to retaliate with nuclear weapons. That would have been more than a little ugly, and a far worse outcome than the one we got.

I think even JFK was extremely reckless for having precipitated the entire event in the first place. So what if the Russians were amassing missiles on Cuba? We still had plenty to deter the Russians from using them. Within just a few years, the Russians had developed ballistic missile submarines that could loiter unseen even closer to Washington DC and New York than Cuba. So what exactly did the Cuban Missile Crisis achieve, other than risking annihilation and scaring a lot of people for no good reason?

When LeMay passed in 1990, just after the fall of Communism, I remember thinking at the time that he probably just didn't have anything left to live for.

« Last Edit: August 30, 2012, 03:05:22 PM by ka9q »

Offline carpediem

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Re: A FAIR DEBATE
« Reply #187 on: August 30, 2012, 03:09:54 PM »
Like King George VI.

??
A stutter I presume he means. There was a popular motion picture on the subject quite recently.

Offline Donnie B.

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Re: A FAIR DEBATE
« Reply #188 on: August 30, 2012, 04:19:14 PM »
Like King George VI.

??
A stutter I presume he means. There was a popular motion picture on the subject quite recently.
That was George III, the American Revolution George.

George VI was the guy who followed Edward VIII (It was love, love, love, love, love alone caused King Edward to leave his throne).

ETA: Oops, I was mistaken.  George III had a movie too, but it was about his mental health, not his stuttering.  It was indeed George VI who was the subject of The King's Speech.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2012, 04:24:54 PM by Donnie B. »