Author Topic: Question Re Map - 143 - 2018-09-11  (Read 389 times)

Offline OhPulease

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Question Re Map - 143 - 2018-09-11
« on: September 11, 2018, 07:42:06 PM »
In the third quadrant of the image, that is about '6 to 9 o'clock' in the square. There is a jump in the path of the ISS. Am I being stupid as to what this jump is? Otherwise, can you guys explain?

Thanks.

Offline OhPulease

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Re: Question Re Map - 143 - 2018-09-11
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2018, 07:48:07 PM »
Oh bugger, I've just realised I am indeed an idiot. What I am viewing is amazing!

Offline Trebor

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Re: Question Re Map - 143 - 2018-09-11
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2018, 10:09:46 AM »

Offline bknight

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Re: Question Re Map - 143 - 2018-09-11
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2018, 12:34:16 PM »
So I'm curious "what you saw that was a mystery?"
Truth needs no defense.  Nobody can take those footsteps I made on the surface of the moon away from me.
Eugene Cernan

Offline Northern Lurker

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Re: Question Re Map - 143 - 2018-09-11
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2018, 03:56:18 PM »
In youtube video Trebor posted, on bottom left quadrant is ground track of ISS. South of India, there is a discontinuity in the track.

I was wondering it for a while, too. Until it dawned on me too  ;)

Lurky

Offline Kiwi

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Re: Question Re Map - 143 - 2018-09-11
« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2018, 07:20:58 AM »
Horrors!  This site has a much, much greater "discontinuity."
http://www.isstracker.com/

Actually, it's one of the best maps for the ISS's orbits on the internet, because you can change so many things on it. Select three different maps, remove the ISS's ground track (and that "discontinuity"), uncentre the ISS, remove or show its horizon, change to metric units (yay!), and zoom in and out to a large degree.

The horizon is useful for three things -- it shows what's visible from the ISS, the areas on the ground from where it can be seen, and it lightens the night-time view of the ground around the ISS.

Uncentering the ISS is useful for zooming in on a particular part of any ground track, such as seeing how close it will pass to your particular location on the current orbit or the next two.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2018, 07:36:20 AM by Kiwi »
Don't criticize what you can't understand. — Bob Dylan, “The Times They Are A-Changin'” (1963)
Some people think they are thinking when they are really rearranging their prejudices and superstitions. — Edward R. Murrow (1908–65)