Author Topic: First Man  (Read 4429 times)

Offline bknight

  • Neptune
  • ****
  • Posts: 2709
Re: First Man
« Reply #75 on: November 16, 2018, 11:12:10 AM »
I'd also note that that lets him gloss over the fact that a lot of Christians accept evolutionary biology.  Like the Pope.


I'd second that thought.
Truth needs no defense.  Nobody can take those footsteps I made on the surface of the moon away from me.
Eugene Cernan

Offline Dalhousie

  • Mars
  • ***
  • Posts: 494
Re: First Man
« Reply #76 on: November 17, 2018, 08:32:56 PM »
I'd also note that that lets him gloss over the fact that a lot of Christians accept evolutionary biology.  Like the Pope.


I'd second that thought.

This Christian geologist and astrobiologist certainly does!

Offline JayUtah

  • Neptune
  • ****
  • Posts: 2979
    • Clavius
Re: First Man
« Reply #77 on: November 19, 2018, 10:20:21 PM »
I'd be careful about using The Right Stuff as a benchmark for movies celebrating spaceflight.

I don't.  But it's evocative of a style.  As history, it's sort of the Amadeus of spaceflight.
"Facts are stubborn things." --John Adams

Offline Dalhousie

  • Mars
  • ***
  • Posts: 494
Re: First Man
« Reply #78 on: November 19, 2018, 11:07:37 PM »
I'd be careful about using The Right Stuff as a benchmark for movies celebrating spaceflight.


Not using it as a benchmark for movies in spaceflight - there are quite a few I thought better. But pointing out some stylistic similarities and shoutouts.

Offline mako88sb

  • Earth
  • ***
  • Posts: 248
Re: First Man
« Reply #79 on: December 18, 2018, 03:14:34 PM »
There was also the scene with Neil leaving baby Karen's bracelet on the moon... did that happen? I don't remember it.
AFAIK, that was all artistic licence.

I read an interview with Hansen where he says as much, along with "We don't really know", arguing that no-one ever saw Armstrong's PPK so it could have been. It's a nice thought and I hope it is.

Saw this a few weeks ago and one thing I can't really recall from the book(which I can't seem to find) is why he deviated from the EVA to visit the crater? Seems out of character for someone like him, especially the first manned lunar landing and all the risks that some felt might be present. Anyway, if somebody has the book handy, I'd appreciate what it says about this. While I'm at it, what was Armstrong's response to Yeager's book claiming Neil didn't listen to him in regards to the dry lake bed "touch & go" were they ended up stuck? Pretty sure he hinted that it was actually Yeager who insisted on the "touch & go".

Offline Ranb

  • Earth
  • ***
  • Posts: 167
Re: First Man
« Reply #80 on: December 18, 2018, 08:56:36 PM »
The Yeager and Armstrong version of events of that day are very different.  Yeager says he tried to talk Armstrong out of the touch and go; Armstrong says that didn't happen.  Also according to Armstrong, Yeager suggested a 2nd touch and go with a slower speed after touching down; that is when the plane got stuck.

The author, James R. Hanson has comments in the book "First Man" about how Yeager's recall of the event seems to change over the years.

I've read a few autobiographies and compared them to biographies written by historians.  While the autobiographical books make for entertaining reading I've found that other books about the same person seem to be more factual, as far as I can tell.  Compare Yeager's autobiography to Louis Rotundo's "Into the Unknown" as well as Gregory Boyington's "Baa Baa Black Sheep" to Bruce Gamble's "Black Sheep One". 
« Last Edit: December 18, 2018, 08:59:58 PM by Ranb »

Offline Obviousman

  • Mars
  • ***
  • Posts: 390
Re: First Man
« Reply #81 on: December 19, 2018, 01:59:01 AM »
...as well as Gregory Boyington's "Baa Baa Black Sheep" to Bruce Gamble's "Black Sheep One". 

Especially concerning the attainment of 'ace' status. I really enjoyed both books but I think the latter has more credence.

Offline Ranb

  • Earth
  • ***
  • Posts: 167
Re: First Man
« Reply #82 on: December 19, 2018, 08:47:02 AM »
Well, Boyington certainly was an ace, with at least 16 or so planes.  I'd like to read a book about Erich Hartmann from a source more reliable than UFO writer Trevor Constable.

Offline mako88sb

  • Earth
  • ***
  • Posts: 248
Re: First Man
« Reply #83 on: December 23, 2018, 10:30:52 AM »
The Yeager and Armstrong version of events of that day are very different.  Yeager says he tried to talk Armstrong out of the touch and go; Armstrong says that didn't happen.  Also according to Armstrong, Yeager suggested a 2nd touch and go with a slower speed after touching down; that is when the plane got stuck.

The author, James R. Hanson has comments in the book "First Man" about how Yeager's recall of the event seems to change over the years.


While X-mas shopping I seen the movie cover version of First Man so got a chance to check out what I was asking about. Along with what you said I started a discussion over at a military aviation forum about some of Yeager's claims and many voiced the opinion that there was a lot of embellishment in his books. Probably true and most likely expected.

As for my first question, I guess saying he deviated from the EVA is wrong. They just had some basic guideline not to stray too far from the LM and he felt heading to the crater was a reasonable thing to do to get some photos of it. Whether or not he took a personal minute or 2 will never be known which is the way it should be.

Offline Dalhousie

  • Mars
  • ***
  • Posts: 494
Re: First Man
« Reply #84 on: December 29, 2018, 05:27:10 AM »
The Yeager and Armstrong version of events of that day are very different.  Yeager says he tried to talk Armstrong out of the touch and go; Armstrong says that didn't happen.  Also according to Armstrong, Yeager suggested a 2nd touch and go with a slower speed after touching down; that is when the plane got stuck.

The author, James R. Hanson has comments in the book "First Man" about how Yeager's recall of the event seems to change over the years.


While X-mas shopping I seen the movie cover version of First Man so got a chance to check out what I was asking about. Along with what you said I started a discussion over at a military aviation forum about some of Yeager's claims and many voiced the opinion that there was a lot of embellishment in his books. Probably true and most likely expected.

As for my first question, I guess saying he deviated from the EVA is wrong. They just had some basic guideline not to stray too far from the LM and he felt heading to the crater was a reasonable thing to do to get some photos of it. Whether or not he took a personal minute or 2 will never be known which is the way it should be.

Yeager's version of several events has been questioned, including that of his NF-104 flight http://www.kalimera.org/nf104/stories/stories_13.html