Author Topic: "Apollo 11" Documentary  (Read 3038 times)

Offline JayUtah

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #45 on: April 04, 2019, 06:15:31 PM »
But if memory serves, the footage I saw in the Doc the "smudge" was on the right of the ship. Maybe they reversed the film.

They did not.  This clip appears in Apollo 11 exactly in the orientation seen in the YouTube link.  Perhaps your recollection is spotty.  No pun intended.
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Offline onebigmonkey

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #46 on: April 05, 2019, 08:47:29 AM »
And of course there were photographs as well:


Offline apollo16uvc

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #47 on: April 05, 2019, 12:34:13 PM »
There's no guarantee it will be available digitized for download.  The producers obtained the source footage as the original dupe masters -- i.e., film.  You may have to contact NASA's photo archive contractor to obtain similar footage.
I asked at which resolution the film was scanned, and if it will be avaible. Got the following reply:

"Yes, all of the 65mm Panavision film that was scanned at 8K will be turned back over to the National Archives, to allow other filmmakers the chance to use this material, too. And there may still be more to come from our team... stay tuned."

And 65mm Panavision does indeed have that much resolving power. Especially with cine-quality lenses.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2019, 12:39:56 PM by apollo16uvc »
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Offline JayUtah

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #48 on: April 05, 2019, 04:04:08 PM »
That's exciting.  I don't think Apollo photography has received this much love since Michael Light.
"Facts are stubborn things." --John Adams

Offline LunarOrbit

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #49 on: May 14, 2019, 10:10:45 PM »
I just discovered that the Apollo 11 documentary is now available on DVD/blu-ray and from streaming services like the Google Play store and iTunes.

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Offline ka9q

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #50 on: May 15, 2019, 03:44:19 AM »
Not likely, as the television connection required a lot of effort from the crew and even more effort from the MSFN operators.  Because the MSFN was not permanently configured for television -- they had to lease lines that were ordinarily given over to commercial use -- it was not common to have impromptu transmissions.  Further, the ascent and rendezvous was considered one of the most critical operations of the flight.  It's not a time when people would be mucking about with the television camera.  The Maurer cameras, however, could be mounted in windows and left alone.  For example, the terminal approach phase of the LM, which was depicted in the film, is actually at artificial speed because it was taken at 6 frames per second by the CM DAC mounted in a window.  The filmmakers seems to have converted it at the 24-30 fps rate.  Because if you play it back at natural speed, it's really boring.
I'd love to go back to the moon just so we could all experience it properly, with modern digital cameras and communications. Except for the Hasselblads, none of the Apollo photography holds a candle to what can be easily done today with modern digital cameras, in real time.

Offline JayUtah

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #51 on: May 15, 2019, 10:02:36 AM »
Stereo, high frame rate, high resolution.  Stereo is important; much of the contour of the lunar surface is lost in single-lens photography.
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Offline ka9q

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #52 on: May 15, 2019, 03:29:38 PM »
Stereo, high frame rate, high resolution.  Stereo is important; much of the contour of the lunar surface is lost in single-lens photography.
Yes. A few stereo photographs of the lunar surface go a long way toward explaining why shadows appear as they do.

Offline PDI-11

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #53 on: June 19, 2019, 12:27:36 PM »
In case someone has not seen this documentary yet, CNN will start airing it on June 23. https://www.cnncreativemarketing.com/project/apollo11/

Maybe if you sit close to the TV and turn the sound way up, it will be (almost) as good as in the theater.  ;)

I told my wife that I plan to record it and watch it every night before going to sleep.

Offline Apollo 957

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #54 on: June 30, 2019, 06:22:49 AM »
Saw it at our local IMAX on Friday. Some wonderful stuff that I hadn't seen before, and a presentation that brought a whole new light to stuff that I had; for instance...

The monstrosity of a vehicle that rumbled and crawled the Saturn V from the VAB to launch pad. The feeling of endless climbing as the astronauts ascended the launch tower toward the CM. Seeing the Hassleblad stills from the EVAs at an incredible size, with an absolute bucketload of detail.... etc etc. 

Loved it.

Offline Zakalwe

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #55 on: June 30, 2019, 09:30:03 AM »
I agree with all of the above. Opening with the crawler was a masterstroke.
Wonderful movie, great soundtrack...the 90 minutes fly-by.


Also, keep an eye out for this, releasing the week after next

Armstrong https://g.co/kgs/YxY5gz
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Offline Donnie B.

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #56 on: June 30, 2019, 01:58:09 PM »
I noticed one thing that seemed odd to me (just was reminded of it when I saw it again on CNN).

During the burns (TLI, LOI, etc.) a display showed the spacecraft's speed, illustrating the change due to the burn.  But when the crew reported engine cutoff, the speed continued to change for several more seconds before leveling off.

Was that an error in the video production, or did the engines (S-IVB and/or SM) continue to provide some thrust for a short time after cutoff?

Offline ka9q

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Re: "Apollo 11" Documentary
« Reply #57 on: June 30, 2019, 07:05:39 PM »
Large engines do take some time to shut down, but I don't know if the duration depicted is accurate or what triggered the callouts (e.g., the shutdown command to the engine, or the subsequent decay in chamber pressure.)