Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
The Reality of Apollo / Re: Newly released Apollo 11 comms
« Last post by bknight on November 14, 2018, 05:53:59 PM »
I have been opening from the web, not saving to the HDD.  Also VLC wasn't the software installed.  I'm on a different machine Win 7  I7 processor with 8 GB.  I'll try downloading the files on the other lap and try that way.
Thanks
2
The Reality of Apollo / Re: Newly released Apollo 11 comms
« Last post by molesworth on November 14, 2018, 04:24:20 PM »
I attempted to listen to the first audio, 11-03301, But find it is in "slow motion".  It is playing one the web, so I'm not sure how to speed it up to normal.  Any suggestions?
Maybe appropriate for the old coder's saying "it works on my machine"  ;D  (Yes, I'm an old coder!)

But as a serious answer, if you scroll down the page (move your mouse out of the recordings area) there are various download options.  WAV are very big, but probably the original quality.  Compressed FLAC if you want lossless, but still pretty big files.  For smaller sizes, mp3 if you don't care about quality, and ogg if you do  ;)

Thanks for the info old coder  However, I attempted the default(whatever that format is), mp3, ogg(Had to install new player) wave and all displayed the same slowness.


So what hardware/software did your get the file to play properly?  Dell Latitude E5530 with 8M ram here
Mine is a Toshiba Satellite Pro laptop, Core i5 with 8Gb of RAM (I think you meant Gb too) so a very similar specification.  I've downloaded the mp3, ogg and wav versions of 11-03301, and tried playing them in Windows Media Player (not ogg) and VLC Player, without any problems.

It looks like something is a bit odd in your machine's handling of media files, but I'd be hard put to say what it is.  My google-fu is failing to get any hint of a similar question anywhere either.

If you have access to another PC anywhere, it might be worth trying your downloaded files on that, to see if it's the file, the PC, or the app that's the problem.  Sorry I can't be of more help on this.
3
General Discussion / Re: First Man
« Last post by JayUtah on November 14, 2018, 11:32:17 AM »
It wasn't bad IMO, good to see the X-15 getting some love.

Richly deserved love, too.  And it makes sense in context since Armstrong remembered his X-15 experience with greater fondness than his Apollo experience.

Quote
And I think it is the only depiction of the mission I can recall seeing that shows his descent down the ladder as being tethered.

My experience with advising indicates that while filmmakers love to collect as much detail as possible, there's a limit to the detail they're actually going to show.  It basically all goes into a notebook to be consulted when specific questions of realism come up -- or embodied in an on-set advisor.  It's likely they identified the tether as a detail that few if any previous depictions had mentioned, and possibly something that would make theirs stand out.

Quote
The scenes with his daughter made me go all misty-eyed......

Of course; the intent was to make a biography, which is eminently about character -- the human story.  We know we can go to any number of documentary films produced over the decades and get a dispassionate story about the details and events.  I gather the intent was not so much to explore Neil Armstrong as an engineer and pilot so much as Neil Armstrong as a husband and father.  Of course the two are the same man, so you can't simply ignore what makes us curious about his life.

Quote
Some liberties with history (Armstrong's facial injury after his ejection appears to be a shout out to "The right stuff" - as do some of the fuzzy special effects...

Indeed.  I went into the film remembering that this is a director who starts his L.A. love story with a production number on a stalled freeway.  I expected it to be a surreal depiction of space exploration in much the same way The Right Stuff was.

Quote
Were spacecraft interiors really that dimly lit?

Not usually, but the dark end of the histogram is where people are shooting these days.  It's stylistic of our period.

Quote
The grubbiness of the spacecraft interiors does not fit with them being brand new and assembled in clean rooms.

Indeed.  Someone in my party leaned over and said, "Someone needs to get in there with some Windex."
4
The Hoax Theory / Re: Alien Structures on Moon
« Last post by Rob48 on November 14, 2018, 09:46:09 AM »
The shock death comes as UFO hunters are still reeling from the death of another legendary whistleblower.

Retired US Army Command Sergeant Major Robert Dean died aged 89 on 11 October in Tucson, Arizona.


What kind of world do we live in when a whistleblower can't reasonably expect to make it to his 90th birthday?  ::)
5
General Discussion / Re: First Man
« Last post by Zakalwe on November 14, 2018, 03:52:22 AM »
The grubbiness of the spacecraft interiors does not fit with them being brand new and assembled in clean rooms.

Yeah, that stuck out for me too. The interior of the Gemini looked filthy, especially given as they weren't re-used. Put it like this, if that was a used car then I'd be walking away from it.
6
General Discussion / Re: First Man
« Last post by Dalhousie on November 13, 2018, 05:46:15 PM »
It wasn't bad IMO, good to see the X-15 getting some love.

And I think it is the only depiction of the mission I can recall seeing that shows his descent down the ladder as being tethered.

The scenes with his daughter made me go all misty-eyed......

Some liberties with history (Armstrong's facial injury after his ejection appears to be a shout out to "The right stuff" - as do some of the fuzzy special effects - and he definitely did not go home after his ejection but rather to the office where he carried on with paper work.

A few things made me raise my eyebrows:

The noise and vibration appear to have been exaggerated for dramatic purposes compared to what they actually were.

Were spacecraft interiors really that dimly lit?  Doesn't match photographs from missions.  More a repeat of a trope from everything from Alien to The Expanse (don't get me started).

The grubbiness of the spacecraft interiors does not fit with them being brand new and assembled in clean rooms.

The lunar craters in some shots look like they are from a 1950s movie .

7
The Hoax Theory / Re: Alien Structures on Moon
« Last post by Dalhousie on November 13, 2018, 05:32:46 PM »
Besides,  what motivation would NASA have to keep this secret? Imagine how much NASA's budget would balloon if they could report ET on the moon. Trying to keep it secret would be really shooting themselves in the foot.

I wanted to elaborate on this a bit.  Not only does it not make sense that NASA would keep this a secret, they have actually DEMONSTRATED to behave contrary to what this claim would suggest.  Following the Apollo 11, 12 and 14 missions, astronauts were placed into quarantine for a period of time.  While the fear might have been minimal, there was a real fear of what alien bacteria/microbes, etc. the astronauts might have brought back from the moon.  While this isn't as romantic as little green mean, the possible ramifications and the type of mass fear this could potentially result in would be similar.  NASA made no attempts to keep this a secret.  The astronauts did interviews from within these quarantine units.  It was common knowledge that they were there, and why they were there.  So, not only is there absolutely no reason to believe what the OP says based on the total lack of any supporting evidence, The ACTUAL demonstrated behavior by NASA is entirely inconsistent with what is suggested by the claim as well.

As does the response to the Viking experiments and meteorite ALH84001
8
The Reality of Apollo / Re: Exclusive look at Apollo 14 NASA photos
« Last post by apollo16uvc on November 13, 2018, 04:18:51 PM »
I can recommend the Microsoft ICE 2.0 stitching software. it was able to seamlessly automatically stitch 20-some Apollo Metric Mapping Camera pictures. It also automatically corrects for viewing angle, and path of the photographer. It tries best to even out the lighting differences between AMPC frames.

I tried stitching the Hycon photos, but it gets confused by the black clock and framing spaces. After removing the borders it worked flawlessly and takes just a few minutes with full-res PNG files.

I recommend converting tiff files to PNG because it drastically reduces processing time and hardware requirements.

I know you have made some panorama's from Apollo live TV footage, the ICE 2.0 software can also create panorama images from video, might be worth a shot. if not, I am sure it can merge them when screenshotted.

See some of the work I have done here:
(OPEN ONLY ON FREE CONNECTION, IT WILL DOWNLOAD +700 MB PREVIEWS)

https://archive.org/details/Spacep-anoramas
9
The Reality of Apollo / Re: Exclusive look at Apollo 14 NASA photos
« Last post by onebigmonkey on November 13, 2018, 03:04:02 PM »
I finally tracked the location of the Mag 79 images.

While the transcript indicated that Roosa had experimented with this magazine immediately after the failure of Mag 80, it became apparent (after spending days looking!) that Mag 79's images did not lie on that orbital path. The clue came from later on in the transcript, where he discusses what he did while Antares was on the way down:

Quote
I did not take the LTC photo target 16; I figured that Gordon had implied that it might be a waste of film to shoot them this way; I thought maybe we could get it fixed, we could save the film. I did shoot the landing because I figured, even if it is working - that one we wouldn't have another chance at. And I fired 39 frames off of magazine B [the transcript refers to 'B' a couple of times, I believe it's an error] on the landing per the pad. I don't know whether it will turn out or not, because it - it clanked and fluttered the whole time.

It is such a shame that the camera failed, because he did indeed capture the landing site, marked with the red dot here:



and with the quality of the images could have captured the LM immediately after touchdown, or possibly during the landing itself! That said it is not as closely zoomed in as the earlier sessions - the area covered here is 150 km long by 35 km wide, much more than with the same number of frames in Mag 80.

As he also tried some other tests of the Hycon there may still be other images available from that magazine somewhere.
10
General Discussion / Re: First Man
« Last post by JayUtah on November 13, 2018, 12:51:54 PM »
I wish I'd had more involvement with this film.  But Singer had already solidified the screenplay before my friend Patrick (Elliott See) figured out I was an Apollo authority.  (He actually knows me from my involvement with the Utah arts and theater world.)  Our conversations mostly revolved around the pre-Apollo furor, since that's what he want to talk about for his character.  Honestly I expected Damien Chazelle to make his film poetic, closer to The Right Stuff than to Ron Howard's Apollo 13.  And in that respect I was not disappointed.  Was that Neil Armstrong?  No, not really.  Do rockets make those noises?  No, not really.  That much didn't matter to me because I went into the film expecting that sort of depiction from this team.

I will take credit for one thing, though.  We got talking about Apollo 1, and the thing I mentioned to Patrick was that no one -- not even the many books written or documentaries filmed on Apollo development -- really captures how quickly the accident happened.  We all like to think there was a credible chance to rescue the crew.  There wasn't.  It was all over in 13 seconds.  And it's not too much of a spoiler to say that Chazelle must have somehow got the message:  the depiction of the accident from "Fire in the cockpit!" to the rupture of the CM hatch takes exactly 13 seconds of screen time.  For me, that excuses a lot of the liberties I knew were going to be taken.  If you take nothing away from this film, give him credit for that.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10