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Designing and flying are two different sets of skills.

Or to use an example that should be even more familiar to most... programming a computer game is different from playing it...
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Apologies for re-popping a months old thread, but I couldn't help noticing the similarities between cambo's debate and writing style, and an unbeliever I wrangled with for two weeks on Twitter recently.  At one point we both sort of acknowledged our mutual autism and agreed that the debate probably wouldn't end any time soon.   ;D

I just felt the exchange warranted a mention because the commonalities were so striking.

If the designer can presume that man will be a skilled pilot, his task is that much easier.  Especially when there's an end-of-decade deadline.

I've often wondered about the definition of Kennedy's deadline and how it was popularly interpreted.  Since a decade can refer to any 10-year period, was he referring to the decade of the "60's", meaning Jan 1 1960 ~ Dec 31 1969, or was he referring to the 197th decade of the Gregorian calendar, meaning Jan 1 1961 ~ Dec 31 1970.

If the latter, then NASA had a year + 5 months left on the clock to complete the mission instead of 5 months.

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The Hoax Theory / Re: Hunchback aka inquisitivemind.
« Last post by bknight on September 18, 2018, 08:54:04 AM »
Kangaboy, Jarrah White.

OK, but why was he tagged with that handle?  I've seen his name posted all over this forum.
Minimise search hits for the moron.

LOL, Ok.
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The Hoax Theory / Re: Hunchback aka inquisitivemind.
« Last post by Abaddon on September 18, 2018, 08:43:22 AM »
Kangaboy, Jarrah White.

OK, but why was he tagged with that handle?  I've seen his name posted all over this forum.
Minimise search hits for the moron.
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General Discussion / Re: We're going to the moon again!
« Last post by bknight on September 18, 2018, 08:06:30 AM »
This is similar to the direct ascent mode that was eliminated by NASA as it would take far too big a rocket (NOVA) to start.  I haven't seen the video, nor have I studied the mission, but what changed from 1962-63 to 2018?  Is the BFR similar in thrust to the NOVA?  Orbital mechanics haven't changed so what am I missing?


ETA: After some research I find the planning thrust for BFR is 11.8 M lbs versus the NOVA 11.7 M lbs (14.4 m lbs upgrade).
So the rockets do compare favorably.
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The Hoax Theory / Re: Hunchback aka inquisitivemind.
« Last post by benparry on September 18, 2018, 05:11:47 AM »
Hunchbacked is still very active on a few groups and pages on FB.
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General Discussion / Re: We're going to the moon again!
« Last post by raven on September 18, 2018, 01:30:21 AM »
It's going to be awhile before this happens. Falcon Heavy was a development of an existing, fairly standard (aside from the first stage recovery) design. The Big Fu . . .I mean Falcon Rocket is a whole other kettle of fish. I admire Elon Musk's willingness to put his money where his mouth is and actually work on the things he dreams about and lordy does he dream big, but I worry this might be too big to pull off.
Still, he's pulled off some amazing stuff  before, so I wish him and SpaceX the best of this. Just hope he can get his ego back in check.
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General Discussion / Re: We're going to the moon again!
« Last post by Peter B on September 18, 2018, 12:47:15 AM »
Some further thoughts...

- The spacecraft's landing system is interesting. Two of its three legs are moveable, and it also has a pair of control surfaces near the nose. According to the information, these four control surfaces steer the spacecraft as it dives into an atmosphere at a high angle of attack, while its speed drops to under supersonic. The spacecraft then turns vertical to fire rockets to land. Sure, it all makes sense - at this stage of the mission the spacecraft is going to have a high volume for low mass, so it's going to have a relatively low terminal velocity.

But what interests me is that the one spacecraft design appears to apply for landings on Earth, Moon and Mars, which (obviously) have very different amounts of gravity and atmosphere (unless there was something I missed when I skipped bits). So I assume they have robust maths to demonstrate that this method will work with a Mars landing rather than just an Earth landing, which was all they appeared to demonstrate.

- The spacecraft appears to store some cargo under its base, in the space between the engine bells and the stage skirt. I assume the logic is that the spacecraft's engines fire up only when its up so high there's virtually no atmosphere to conduct or convect heat from the combustion chamber to the adjacent cargo pods. But again maybe that's something I missed as I skipped through the video.

It'll be interesting to read what industry experts have to say about all this.
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General Discussion / Re: We're going to the moon again!
« Last post by Peter B on September 17, 2018, 11:10:04 PM »
I skimmed through the broadcast.

What I saw was interesting, but I think they're highly optimistic if they expect that lunar mission to happen when they announced (2023 I think), given how much the first launch of the Falcon Heavy was delayed.

I also hope SpaceX has a good executive structure in place so it doesn't have to rely on Musk himself to achieve results - he's been getting himself into the news for the wrong reasons too often in the last few months: the Thai cave submarine fiasco followed by the paedophile accusation (and now he's being sued over it); the announcement of his intention to make Tesla a private company followed by a reversal a week later; his Trump-like criticism of the media; and some unhelpful criticism of Tesla skeptics...
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General Discussion / Re: We're going to the moon again!
« Last post by BDL on September 17, 2018, 10:40:45 PM »
SpaceX is now announcing the first private passenger to orbit the moon!
You know, I think this may be the most excited I've ever been so far!
Congratulations, Elon Musk. And all the SpaceX scientists and engineers, too.
I hope NASA starts sending astronauts to the moon again. It's been too long.


So is the guy or the right the passenger?

The Japanese guy is the passenger. His name is Yusaku Maezawa.
He's an artist. And he's planning to bring (6, probably?) other artists with him. I'm not sure at all about how these artists are going to pilot the craft or how they’ll fix any engineering problems that may arise, but nonetheless - there'll be a couple artists going around the moon.
Elon Musk was asked if he was going go with him and he basically answered "I don't know, maybe." in a joking way.
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