Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Stills from it were available in the popular media and I have several examples of it, as well as one of those super 8 reels of edited highlights.

Pretty sure all you had to do was write in and ask for copies!
2
Currently talking with a HB. He claims that the onboard 16mm footage of the moonwalk from Apollo 11 had been kept hidden until a few years ago when it was shown by a brave, but unknown spreader. I called this BS, as the film has always been available to those who requested it through a FOIA request. This is the footage in question:

https://youtu.be/6GtCvZlXeVk?t=8m11s

Of course, the beginning of this video (0:00) shows that this video had existed since at least 1994 (dated 06-20-94). Is there any signs of it existing prior to this? What is it denoted as in the NASA archive files? I do know that the same footage existed on Super 8 reels too: https://shop.kusera.de/Apollo-11-Man-on-the-moon-Color-Columbia-8mm-Home-Movie and I used to own one. I do know this one was much older. I used to actually own a reel of it.
3
Big update!

I got in contact with the current head of the Bochum Observatory.

Here are the main notes from the replies:

1. Audio tapes are audible.
2. There are lots of down-link satellite pictures on film.
3. "The 2 inch tapes we have access to the German television WDR ind Cologne." (Not sure what that means. I suppose it means the 2-inch Quadruplex video tapes have been digitized.)

4. There already is access to most of the data.
5. The data is undergoing preparation and research. The project is a scholarly work.
6. The archive is currently not yet open to the public. The head of bochum wants to publish the works himself. Only small parts of the archive may be published until the project is finished.
7. Because of the preparation and research project, access to the tapes and data can currently not be provided.

And for those wondering: I have NOT contacted NASA, ESA or any other agency. I was hoping the archive could be digitized without their help.

As soon as their is an other big update, I will post it.

For the mean while, you can find my growing collection of tapes here: https://archive.org/details/@apollo_16_uvc_s201_as16-123
I am working on some big projects outside bochum.

This includes digitizing a dutch observatory and digitizing network archive tapes containing NASA audio.

I suspect the  network archive tapes are internal recordings of the NASA feed provided to TV and radio networks. If so, they could be of better quality than any amateur recording made from TVs and radio stations.
4
General Discussion / Re: James Webb Space Telescope
« Last post by bknight on January 16, 2018, 11:28:48 AM »
JWST has passed the cryogenic tests

https://jwst.nasa.gov/recentaccomplish.html

Still looking for launch in 2019.
5
The Reality of Apollo / Re: How did the SSTV conversion work?
« Last post by Willoughby on January 15, 2018, 11:41:19 AM »
From my book, "Live TV From the Moon" (pp129 - 131):

Despite the efforts of Westinghouse, their idea for a converter was ultimately never used during any Apollo mission. A scan converter built by RCA was the unit chosen to convert the slow scan TV signal from Apollo 7, Apollo 8, Apollo 9 and the Apollo 11 moonwalk. Their unit very similar to that devised by Westinghouse, used a stock standard video camera which
had seen use in film-to-video telecine, and in the days prior to videotape was also used to record video onto film (a process known as kinescope). It was a black-and white Vidicon tube camera pointed at a 10” high resolution cathode ray monitor. The monitor had a persistent phosphor which caused the image to remain on the screen for longer than normal. The TK-22 was gated to record 1 frame as it was written onto the high resolution screen.

The output from the camera was a standard interlaced NTSC video signal. 1 full frame of video information was composed from two fields of 262.5 lines which the camera could not properly record from the 10 frame-per-second rate. The first field was recorded correctly, but the second field would be recording off the monitor when the next frame of video information was already being written, resulting in a messy signal which generated a lot of problems in the conversion process.

This snag was overcome by recording the first field onto a video disc recorder which would then repeat the redundant field with a delay built into every second field to allow it to mimic the missing field that the camera was unable to capture. Essentially, the TK-22 recorded the first field, with the disc recorder repeating the fields while adjusting them so that they correctly formed a full NTSC image. This process was repeated to form the “missing” 3 frames of NTSC video and the resulting output was a fully compatible NTSC video signal. There was one major drawback, which unfortunately the technology of the time could not solve. The picture was unavoidably degraded as it was optically converted and this on top of the already reduced resolution of the incoming slow scan TV signal.

The system controls were rather straightforward. A test pattern generator was incorporated into the converter to assist in calibration prior to receiving an incoming signal. The type of slow scan signal could also be selected between the 10 and .625 frames-per-second rates, though in the case of Apollo 11, the high resolution mode, while always available,
was never actually used. A variety of controls relating to video synchronization and video level settings were accessible to adjust the signal, in most cases the controls were separately configured for either the standard or high resolution modes. The final output path allowed image enhancement and adjustment of the video disk recorder. The resultant signal could be made as visually appealing as possible, although despite all the controls, the fact was that the slow scan image was optically converted-and that resulted in a loss of resolution of the picture.

Thanks! 
6
The Reality of Apollo / Re: How did the SSTV conversion work?
« Last post by dwight on January 15, 2018, 08:21:53 AM »
From my book, "Live TV From the Moon" (pp129 - 131):

Despite the efforts of Westinghouse, their idea for a converter was ultimately never used during any Apollo mission. A scan converter built by RCA was the unit chosen to convert the slow scan TV signal from Apollo 7, Apollo 8, Apollo 9 and the Apollo 11 moonwalk. Their unit very similar to that devised by Westinghouse, used a stock standard video camera which
had seen use in film-to-video telecine, and in the days prior to videotape was also used to record video onto film (a process known as kinescope). It was a black-and white Vidicon tube camera pointed at a 10” high resolution cathode ray monitor. The monitor had a persistent phosphor which caused the image to remain on the screen for longer than normal. The TK-22 was gated to record 1 frame as it was written onto the high resolution screen.

The output from the camera was a standard interlaced NTSC video signal. 1 full frame of video information was composed from two fields of 262.5 lines which the camera could not properly record from the 10 frame-per-second rate. The first field was recorded correctly, but the second field would be recording off the monitor when the next frame of video information was already being written, resulting in a messy signal which generated a lot of problems in the conversion process.

This snag was overcome by recording the first field onto a video disc recorder which would then repeat the redundant field with a delay built into every second field to allow it to mimic the missing field that the camera was unable to capture. Essentially, the TK-22 recorded the first field, with the disc recorder repeating the fields while adjusting them so that they correctly formed a full NTSC image. This process was repeated to form the “missing” 3 frames of NTSC video and the resulting output was a fully compatible NTSC video signal. There was one major drawback, which unfortunately the technology of the time could not solve. The picture was unavoidably degraded as it was optically converted and this on top of the already reduced resolution of the incoming slow scan TV signal.

The system controls were rather straightforward. A test pattern generator was incorporated into the converter to assist in calibration prior to receiving an incoming signal. The type of slow scan signal could also be selected between the 10 and .625 frames-per-second rates, though in the case of Apollo 11, the high resolution mode, while always available,
was never actually used. A variety of controls relating to video synchronization and video level settings were accessible to adjust the signal, in most cases the controls were separately configured for either the standard or high resolution modes. The final output path allowed image enhancement and adjustment of the video disk recorder. The resultant signal could be made as visually appealing as possible, although despite all the controls, the fact was that the slow scan image was optically converted-and that resulted in a loss of resolution of the picture.
7
The Hoax Theory / Re: How was LM insulation attached?
« Last post by nomuse on January 14, 2018, 12:25:51 PM »
I had an excuse to mention aerospace-quality kapton tape in a bit of light writing recently; I described it as "stronger than steel, with more grip power than a terrified gecko."

The only time I've used a kapton tape myself, it was for the temperature resistance; used it to replace the paper tape (!!) holding down the foil inside my T-962 reflow oven.
8
The Hoax Theory / Re: Apollo Astronauts return from micro-gravity.
« Last post by raven on January 13, 2018, 09:14:41 PM »
...after they left behind the Trailblazer Ik in Earth's orbit.  Nobody noticed this as it was too small for amature astronomers to detect.  On command, the Trailblazer IK reentered and gave...
For starters, what in heck is the Trailblazer Ik? I googled it for funzies, and I came up with . . . an RV?
"...effect of sodium chloride seeding of the Trailblazer Ik payload are discussed."

Check
https://www.google.ca/search?safe=off&ei=SHdaWt30MsLojwOo8LzwCg&q="trailblazer+Ik"+space&oq="trailblazer+Ik"+space&gs

There are about six links to some NASA articles from around 50 years ago..
Neat! Now that is actually something interesting! ;D
9
The Hoax Theory / Re: Apollo Astronauts return from micro-gravity.
« Last post by Abaddon on January 13, 2018, 06:23:16 PM »
Some HBs on the internet theorize that the astronauts were dropped from a DC-133 Cargomaster and parachuted back to Earth.  The missions were sent remotely to the moon after they left behind the Trailblazer Ik in Earth's orbit.  Nobody noticed this as it was too small for amature astronomers to detect.  On command, the Trailblazer IK reentered and gave the preliminary reentry telemetry prior to the drop of the command module from the DC-133 Cargomaster during the supposed plasma sheath blackout.   Some believe that is why the astronouts had unnoticable bone calcium depletion.  a94-f
NASA tested the CM for splashdown. Why would they not do so? HB nutters simply conflate testing with the live missions because they are comprehensively crazy.
10
The Hoax Theory / Re: Apollo Astronauts return from micro-gravity.
« Last post by onebigmonkey on January 13, 2018, 04:51:54 PM »
Well we learn something new every day.

We learn that the trailblazer program was used to understand the behaviour of objects during re-entry to try and see what would happen to the CM.

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19680025668.pdf

Which is very cool.

What we don't learn from this is how an 'up and down' probe launched from a modified ICBM would be placed in orbit by a different unmanned probe before it went on to the moon, stay in orbit without any means of controlling itself, and how the Trailblazer would be remotely activated at just the right point in time. We also don't learn is how an 8" diameter sphere would somehow present itself as a large CM in a radar profile. It may have been out of radio contact, but it wasn't invisible.

What we do learn is that the contortions of the hoax theory know no limits, and that their version of 'joining the dots together maaaan' involves drawings in different books.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10